books, stats, The pile, week in books

The Week In Books: September 10 – September 16

A good week in reading.  In case you missed my post on Saturday, I’m on my way to the USA for a couple of months for work – so normal service may be slightly disrupted while I find my feet.  I do have a bunch of posts scheduled to help with the first week, but I can’t write BotW or WiB posts before I’ve read the books…

Read:

Early Riser by Jasper Fforde

Another Day in the Death of America by Gary Younge

In Glorious Technicolour by Francine Stock

The Beautiful Poetry of Donald Trump by Robert Sears

Fantasyland by Kurt Andersen

Negroland by Margo Jefferson

This Is Just My Face: Try Not To Stare by Gabourey Sidibe

Star by Star by Sheena Wilkinson

Started:

P is for Peril by Sue Grafton

Still reading:

Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

A couple of books bought – but I have got a long plane ride to deal with!

books, stats, The pile, week in books

The Week In Books: September 3 – September 9

I’ve been spending my time working my way through the Still Reading list so not as much other stuff read this week as usual.

Read:

The Glitter and the Gold by Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan

The Abbey Girls in Town by Elsie J Oxenham

Too Many Crooks Spoil the Plot by Sarah Osborne

Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance

The Cornish Coast Murder by John Bude

Started:

Negroland by Margo Jefferson

Another Day in the Death of America by Gary Younge

Fantasyland by Kurt Andersen

Still reading:

Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

Early Riser by Jasper Fforde

No books bought! A minor miracle has occurred!

books, stats, The pile, week in books

The Week In Books: August 27 – September 2

Finally finished The Templars this week – it was interesting, but really not my favourite period of history, so it felt like a bit of a slog.  You live and learn!

Read:

Maybe For You by Nicole McLaughlin

Video Killed the Radio Star by Duncan MacMaster

Yes We (Still) Can by Dan Pfeiffer

After You With the Pistol by Kyril Bonfiglioli

Rivers of London: Water Weed 3 by Ben Aaronovitch et al

Anyone for Seconds? by Laurie Graham

The Templars by Dan Jones

Started:

n/a

Still reading:

The Glitter and the Gold by Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan

Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

Early Riser by Jasper Fforde

Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance

Two ebooks bought.

books, stats

August Stats

New books read this month: 31*

Books from the to-read pile: 14

Ebooks read: 15

Books from the Library book pile: 1

Non-fiction books: 7

#ReadHarder categories completed: 9

Pop Sugar categories completed: 13

Most read author: Andrew Cartmel (1 book and 1 comic)

Books read this year:  258

Books bought: 7 ebooks, 5 ebooks

Books on the Goodreads to-read shelf: 568 (I don’t have copies of all of these!)

*Includes some short stories/novellas/comics (3 this month)

books, stats, The pile, week in books

The Week In Books: August 20 – August 26

Another busy week…

Read:

Mrs Roosevelt’s Confidante by Susan Elia McNeal

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 1: Cosmic Avengers by Brian Michael Bendis

The Mystery of Three Quarters by Sophie Hannah

Lord Peter Wimsey: Complete Short Stories by Dorothy L Sayers

The Case of William Smith by Patricia Wentworth

Toucan Keep a Secret by Donna Andrew

Staged to Death by Karen Rose Smith

Started:

Yes We (Still) Can by Dan Pfeiffer

Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance

Maybe For You by Nicole McLaughlin

Still reading:

The Glitter and the Gold by Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan

The Templars by Dan Jones

Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

Mrs Roosevelt’s Confidante by Susan Elia McNeal

Early Riser by Jasper Fforde

Two ebooks and two book-books bought.

books, stats, The pile, week in books

The Week In Books: August 13 – August 19

A working weekend and a trip to see The King and I (it was brilliant – Kelli O’Hara is amazing) affected the reading list this week.  But still not bad really.  I’m mostly working on finishing stuff that I’ve started at the moment as well.

Read:

Porterhouse Blue by Tom Sharpe

Jewish History: A very short introduction by David N Myers

The Birth of Korean Cool bu Euny Hong

Star Dust by Emma Barry

The Lawrence Browne Affair by Cat Sebastian

Who Thought This Was a Good Idea by Alyssa Mastromonaco

Started:

n/a

Still reading:

The Glitter and the Gold by Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan

The Templars by Dan Jones

Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

Mrs Roosevelt’s Confidante by Susan Elia McNeal

Early Riser by Jasper Fforde

Two ebooks and a book-book bought.

Book of the Week, Children's books, Classics, Fantasy, Young Adult

Book of the Week: Howl’s Moving Castle

Two children’s books in a row as BotW? This is totally within the normal range of what I do and what you expect from me. And this is another book that I started during my weekend at boo conference and then got distracted away from by the purchase of more books at said book conference and then by other books on the kindle. So sue me!

cover of Howls Moving Castle

Howl’s Moving Castle tells the story of Sophie, a teenage girl who is turned into an old lady by a witch while she is working in her family’s hat shop. One of the conditions of the curse is that she can’t tell people that she’s been cursed and Sophie doesn’t want her mother or sisters to see what’s happened to her, so she runs away to the hills, where she runs into the moving castle belonging to the Wizard Howl and makes it her new home in the hope that the curse can be lifted. Howl is a temperamental, vacillating young man who is on the run from something and only seems to do things that help himself but Calcifer, his fire demon promises to help her if she can help him with the curse that ties him to Howl. Also living in the castle is Michael, Howl’s apprentice, who, it turns out is in love with one of Sophie’s sisters. And so they move around the countryside, and Sophie tries to figure out how to get her old (young) body back.

That’s the short version of part of the story and doesn’t really do it justice. Before I read the story, I was actually worried that I wouldn’t like it as much as I liked the film of the book which I saw in the cinema back in my high-cinema visiting university days. Now the two are the same basic story: about a teenager who is cursed to look like an old lady and who seeks help from the wizard with the moving castle, but beyond that there are a fair few differences. The movie has a design aesthetic that leads to some differences from the book and it is missing some of the subplots from the book, but it turns out I really liked them both.

I don’t often read the book after I’ve seen the movie, but this time it worked out really well. In fact, this is the opposite experience to what usually happens with me, books and movie adaptations – because quite often I really hate the movie versions of books I’ve loved, so maybe I need to do this more often?! There are a couple more books featuring Howl, which are now on my reading list – and I’m trying hard to work out if I read any Diana Wynne Jones books back when I was the right age for them because I really liked her writing and the style felt somewhat familiar to me.

I bought my copy of Howl’s Moving Castle on Kindle, but it’s also available on Kobo (and it’s 99p on both platforms at time of writing) and in paperback (from Amazon, Book Depository or places like Big Green Books) and audiobook. I think it should be easy enough to buy from a bookshop with a good sized children’s section (not a supermarket because it is no where near new) I suspect it will also be available at some libraries too. And if you haven’t seen the film, you really should watch it too.

Happy Reading!