books, stats, The pile, week in books

The Week In Books: August 7 – August 13

Slightly rejigged posting schedule this week – if you’re looking for this week’s BotW post, click here to read about Derek Farrell’s Death of a Devil (or here for my interview with him) but normal service will resume tomorrow for Recommendsday.

Anyway, quieter week of reading last week, but I was quite busy in real life (I know, what a pain) and that got in the way.  We’ve got some building work coming up at home, so I fear this week may be quieter too, but I’m telling myself that a bit less reading time is worth it to have the work done at home…

Read:

Death of a Devil by Derek Farrell

Motor Mouth by Janet Evanovich

Blue Flame by Jill Shalvis

One Snowy Night by Jill Shalvis

Rescuing Dr McAllister by Sarah Morgan

Started:

The Adventuress by Tasha Alexander

The Mothers by Brit Bennett

Still reading:

The Greedy Queen by Annie Gray

Wise Children by Angela Carter

I was really quite well behaved this week – and didn’t buy anything. A miracle has occurred.  And as the books are about to be packed into boxes, I’m hoping I can resist the urge to buy more until I have an actual bookshelf to put them on again.  Of course that doesn’t help with my ebook buying problem, but you know, baby steps!

books, stats, The pile, week in books

The Week In Books: July 31 – August 6

Check it out: I finished one of the long runners this week!  My still reading list is reducing.  It’s the little things you know.  Anyway, a good week of reading, dominated by one author.  And to be honest, I would have bought more Susan Elizabeth Philips to read, if I wasn’t on a ActualBook buying ban (because we’ve got building work due to happen at the house and everything has to be packed up) and more of the Kindle editions were cheaper…

Read:

The Twelve Clues of Christmas by Rhys Bowen

Kick by Paula Byrne

Dream a Little Dream by Susan Elizabeth Philips

Match Me If You Can by Susan Elizabeth Philips

First Star I See Tonight by Susan Elizabeth Philips

The Girl Who Tweeted Wolf by Nick Bryan

Lord of the Wings by Donna Andrew

Started:

Motor Mouth by Janet Evanovich

Blue Flame by Jill Shalvis

Still reading:

The Greedy Queen by Annie Gray

Wise Children by Angela Carter

Two ebooks bought – First Star I See Tonight as part of the SEP binge and then These Old Shades on ebook because it was only 99p and I wanted to have an e-copy as well as a paper one.  So that doesn’t count really.  And as I’ve already read First Star… that means a net addition to the to-read pile of… zero.  So I’m counting that as a success.

books, stats

July Stats

New books read this month: 32*

Books from the to-read pile: 9

Ebooks read: 18

Books from the Library book pile: 1

Non-fiction books: 3 (although I have several on the go)

#ReadHarder categories completed: 0

Most read author: Susan M Boyer (2 Liz Talbot books

Books read this year: 214

Books bought: 15- all ebooks bar 3

Books on the Goodreads to-read shelf:  534 (I don’t have copies of all of these!)

Read Harder Bingo card
The proper bingo card is back! Hurrah! And I’m more than halfway through the categories! Double Hurrah!

*Includes some short stories/novellas/comics (9 this month)

 

books, stats, The pile, week in books

The Week In Books: July 24 – July 30

Nightshift week and lots of good books read.  You’ll have seen some of them already in my Holiday Reading post too. I started a couple that I didn’t have the brain power to cope with with nightshift brain, but that always happens. But nights are over now and I’m attempting to get my body clock back to some semblance of normal with the help of early nights and more books!

Read:

A Quiet Life in the Country by T E Kinsey

Big Sexy Love by Kirsty Greenwood

Duke With Benefits by Manda Collins

One Kiss in Greece by Kirsty Greenwood

Modern Lovers by Emma Straub

How to Stop Time by Matt Haig

Natural Born Charmer by Susan Elizabeth Philips

Picture Miss Seeton by Heron Carvic

Started:

Wise Children by Angela Carter

The Girl Who Tweeted Wolf by Nick Bryan

The Twelve Clues of Christmas by Rhys Bowen

Still reading:

Kick by Paula Byrne

The Greedy Queen by Annie Gray

I’m afraid some impulse purchasing took place on the nightshifts. But I think that’s entirely understandable really.  I mean it’s hard to resist the urge to purchase at 3am…

non-fiction, Recommendsday, reviews

Recommendsday: Reel History

Need a book that comes in bitesized chunks?  Try Reel History: The World According to the Movie by Alex von Tunzelmann, which is based on her long-running Reel History column in the Guardian.  The basic idea is to compare the movie versions of history with the actual historical fact and the results are frequently hilarious.  Movies are graded on entertainment and on history, because it’s perfectly possible for a film to be both entertaining and historically accurate, although it’s rare.  That’s not to say that she expects films to be slaves to historical accuracy because she’s well aware that what is good history doesn’t always make good watching, but it’s a lovely way of finding out where the truth is behind the films and makes a great jumping off point if you want to disappear down an internet (or library) rabbit hole or two when you find out the truth.

Cover of Reel History by Alex von Tunzelmann
I do love a nice bright cover – and this one is so much fun

Von Tunzelmann has a wicked sense of humour on her, without resorting to cheap shots very often. In fact there’s so much good stuff to giggle about in this that what started out as me reading bits out loud to Him Indoors turned into me reading the whole book out loud to him!  This meant that the book took a lot longer to read than if I’d just been reading it myself, but made for a lovely shared experience as we chuckled together as the movies moved in time from prehistory until the nearly present.  He’d seen a lot more of the movies mentioned than I have, but I still enjoyed the book even the films that I haven’t watched.

I don’t think we can expect many/any more columns – as von Tunzelmann has turned her hand to script writing (she wrote the recent film Churchill) and, as she told Dan Snow’s History Hit podcast, she doesn’t think it’s quite cricket to be on writing films and criticising them.  I’m sad that there won’t be a sequel to this, because I enjoyed it a lot, but I’m off to enjoy the back catalogue on the Guardian website.  I’m also off to take a look at her book Indian Summer, which is about the liberation of India in 1947, which is a subject I know woefully little about and would like to remedy with the 70th anniversary coming upon us next month.

Reel History is available in paperback from all the usual sources and was a bargain £3.49 on Kindle  at time of writing and is also available on Kobo.

Happy Reading!