previews

Half year lookahead!

I did a post at the start of the year with my most Anticipated Books of 2022 so I thought I would revisit and update for the midway point – when we have more details about the releases in the later bit of the year.

As you can see from the photo, I’ve actually read quite a lot of the anticipated stuff that I have copies of from the first half of the year (stuff with a blue line through it means I’ve read it!) and the whole list is quite first half of the year heavy still.

So, what’s on the preorder list at the moment? Well the third (and final?) Vera Kelly book – Vera Kelly: Lost and Found which is out in September. I’ve really enjoyed the first two books in the series which has seen Vera junketing around Argentina and also a children’s home in upstate New York. This one sees Vera heading off to Los Angeles and sees her trying to track down her missing girlfriend. The Kindle is actually already available apparently, but I have the others in this series in paperback and I want them to match…

The next in Olivia Dade’s Spoiler Alert series is out in November – Shipwrecked is about actors who had a one night stand years ago and are now co-stars in an epic to series. And somehow linked in my head, but for reasons I can’t understand is Jen DeLuca’s Ren faire series – I did mention Well Travelled in the first post but it has slipped back further in the year and is now out in December and features the Duelling Kilts band that we’ve met in earlier books.

I’ve also got my eye on Vacationland by Meg Mitchell Matthews, which looks like it could be quality Rich People Problems stuff – with a wife in Maine for the summer with the kids and her husband in Brooklyn looking for funding for his start up. That’s out in August, but it’s a £20 hard back so I’m hanging fire on a preorder at the moment because that’s a lot for a new to me author.

On the non fiction front, I have my eye on Sarah Churchwell’s The Wrath to Come exploring modern America through the myth of Gone with the Wind. I haven’t preordered it yet because the pile is so big and I read hardback none fiction so slowly, but it looks really good.

And finally then there is Joyce Carol Oates’ Blonde, which retells and reimagines the story of Marilyn Monroe and is not new at all – it’s about to be a movie for goodness sake but appears to be out of print in English so I’ve bunged a preorder in for the rerelease in September in case I don’t find a second hand copy sooner!

That’s it for now on the upcoming, but here are links to the posts where I’ve talked about some of my anticipated releases from the first half of the year: The Christie Affair, The Maid, Fatal Crossing, Lady’s Guide to Fortune Hunting, Attack and Decay, Amongst Our Weapons and The Prize Racket. And finally here’s my favourite new books of the first half of 2022.

Book previews

Anticipated books 2022

We’re a few days in to 2022 now, and after the orgy of posts about the past year, it’s time for me to have a little look ahead to the books we have coming our way in this new year.

So the obvious place to start is with the stuff that I’ve got pre-ordered already. Firstly there’s the follow up to Hither, Page by Cat Sebastian, which I’ve been waiting for for ages. It’s called the Missing Page and coming out in the middle of the month (a little late birthday present for myself). Also before the end of January is the Alexis Hall’s first historical romance called Something Fabulous. Also from Alexis Hall, but not pre-ordered yet, and not out until August is Husband Material, the sequel to the wonderful Boyfriend Material.

Away from the romance-y side of things, there is the fourth in the Isabel Rogers’ Stockwell Park Orchestra series. The Prize Racket is out in January and sees the gang taking part in a TV music competition. I can’t wait to see what havoc they wreak. There’s a bit longer to wait for the the Vinyl Detective series, which is out in May, is called Attack and Decay and the musical genre this time is… Death Metal. I cannot wait.

Then there is the stuff that I haven’t pre-ordered yet because I’m waiting to see who has the best edition of it. So that’s books like Amongst Our Weapons, the ninth Rivers of London book. I’ve managed to get the last couple of those in nice signed editions from author events and I’m hoping to do the same again. Also in this category is Heartbreaker, the second in Sarah MacLean’s Hell’s Belles series – this year I got Bombshell sent over from Word in Brooklyn to get a signed copy of the American edition, but I’m hoping that by this summer we may be at a point where Sarah MacLean can come over again and there will once again be a tea party, although my mania for matching sets means I’m not ruling out buying in the American version again…

On top of all of that there are a few things that I have already waiting for me in the NetGalley pile, for I am a very lucky duck. Included in that is Nina de Gramont’s The Christie Affair, out later in January and which is a fictionalised look at what happened in the 11 days that Agatha Christie disappeared for in 1926. I do love a fictionalised real life person book – see my enduring passion for Gone with the Windsors and also my various posts about other examples over the years. Also on the historical mystery front and on the same day is Tom Hindle’s The Fatal Crossing, which is a murder mystery set on a transatlantic crossing in the 1920s. A Scotland Yard detective happens to be on board and so starts to investigate, but he only has a few days to figure out what has happened. Also out the same day as is the very buzzed about The Maid, which features a murder victim discovered by a chambermaid at a fancy hotel. It’s already been optioned for a movie and the info on NetGalley talks about a lot of elements that I like but it also has a couple of people giving it blurbs that make me wonder if it’s going to be too dark for me. We will see…

I’ve had a bit of a fallow period on the historical romance front – with even a few of my old favourites letting me down – but I have high hopes for Sophie Irwin’s debut A Lady’s Guide to Fortune-Hunting, which is set in 1818 and features a young lady who needs to catch a rich husband so the bailiffs don’t move in, but who’s plans could be thwarted by the brother of one of her suitors. Based off the blurb it ticks a lot of my boxes – I’m hoping for it to be a bit of a modern mash up of The Nonesuch and Masqueraders. It’s out in May, so you may have to wait until then to find out if I’ve got the right signals…

I’ve tried to be a bit restrained with my requesting finger on NetGalley, because I still have a lot of books outstandint there – and (once again) one of my New Year’s Resolutions is to deal with that, so just one more to talk about on the advance copy front. Dial A for Aunties made it onto in my best books of the year list for 2022, and I have the sequel Four Aunties and a Wedding via NetGalley already – it’s out in March.

Also on my best books of last year list was Patrick Radden Keefe’s Empire of Pain. He has a new book out in June – called Rogues: True Stories of Grifters, Killers, Rebels and Crooks. The blurb says it’s bringing together some of the best of his writing in the New Yorker – and as I’ve read quite a lot of his New Yorker stuff after I heard Winds of Change (and before my New Yorker subscription expired!), I want to see it in the flesh and have a flick through before I buy it, in case I’ve already read a lot of it, but if you haven’t got a New Yorker subscription, this should definitely be on your list.

You may have noticed that a lot of the books that I’ve talked about so far are for the start of the year. I suspect that’s because the pandemic and the supply chain issues are conspiring to mean that some of the stuff that should already have come out has been pushed back into early 2022 and that some of the stuff that would already have been announced is still waiting on dates and details. So this is where this post gets a bit speculative. The fourth in Jen De Luca’s Well Met series, Well Travelled is due out in September, it’s still long enough away that pre-ordering the Kindle edition isn’t an option in the UK, but as I’m still waiting for my library hold on Well Matched to come in, I can cope!

Over on Facebook Kerry Greenwood has written about the fact that she’s writing a new Phryne Fisher novel called Murder in Williamstown. She’s hoping it will be out in Australia by the end of 2022, but we do often have to wait for the UK edition, so I’m trying not to get my hopes up too much. I’m also hoping there will be something new from Gail Carriger in 2022, but so far she’s not giving any dates for anything in her newsletter so it’s all very up in the air. I’m also hoping the the 2024 date for the next Tessa Dare book gets revised back to 2022, but The Bride Bet is still showing as TBA on her website so anything could happen there too. Despite even less information – it hasn’t even got a title on Amazon or Goodreads yet – I’m more hopeful that the sequel to Battle Royal will be out in 2022 – Lucy Parker usually releases a book a year, so I’m clinging to that.

Book previews

Books I’m looking forward to in 2020

Happy New Year everyone. It’s the start of 2020, so after looking back at 2019, it’s time to look ahead to some of the books coming out this year that I’m excited about.  And as with last year’s list, it’s fairly weighted towards the start of the year – because that’s just how it always happens.  Will one of these be this year’s Daisy Jones and the Six for me? Who knows.

The Mirror and the Light – Hilary Mantel (March)

Cover of The Mirror and the Light

Lets start with the big name, potential blockbuster released.  The final part of Mantel’s Thomas Cromwell trilogy has been so long coming.  It’s about 7 years since I read Bringing up the Bodies – I know because it was pre-this blog, but after I started working at the BBC (I know because I read it during a run of nightshifts up behind the old BBC World studio, which means the latest it can have been is autumn 2012).  I mean it’s even been a few years since the TV adaptation of the first two parts. Whether it can live up to the hype and awards of its predecessors, who knows, but I’ll be reading it to find out.   I studied the Tudors back in the day, and one of the big achievements of this series is to make Thomas Cromwell likeable. I know how this story ends (hint: not well for him) but I can’t wait to see how she finishes it all off.

Miss Austen – Gill Hornby (January)

Cover of Miss Austen

Why did Cassandra Austen destroy a cache of letters written by her famous sister, more that 20 years after Jane’s death? My love of Austen-related books is well known, as it my love of mysteries and books about books and authors so I’m hoping this will be right up my alley.  It’s out at the end of January and I’ve got a copy from NetGalley waiting on the Kindle already, so if I do like it, chances are you’ll be hearing about it.

The 24-Hour Cafe – Libby Page (January)

Cover of The 24-hour Cafe

I really liked Page’s debut, The Lido, when I read it back in April 2018, and I’ve got high hopes for this. Set in a cafe, where two best friends work together, this is promising a story of friendship and community.  The 24-Hour Cafe is another January release that I have a copy of from NetGalley and I’m hoping this will be a nice uplifting book to carry me through the dark and cold of the post-Christmas, pre-birthday period.

The Intoxicating Mr Lavelle (April)

Cover of The Intoxicating Mr Lavelle

Per the blurb Benjamin & Edgar Bowen head off on a Grand Tour of Europe to meet People of Quality, but it turns out the People of Quality may not want to meet them. But then Benjamin meets Horace Lavelle and his education really begins.  I love a grand tour novel and this sounds like it might be right up my street.  I have a copy from NetGalley and so this is another one which you may hear more about sooner rather than later.

The Thursday Murder Club – Richard Osman (September)

This is probably one of the more anticipated books for next year. The blurb for this promises a group of octogenarians, who meet up at their retirement village every week to investigate unsolved killings, investigating a real crime when a property developer ends up dead near by. Sounds right up my street already doesn’t it?  Add to that the fact that Richard Osman is the tall guy behind the desk on Pointless and back when I worked at TV Centre, one of my treats to myself during tea breaks was to go and stand in the viewing gallery and watch episodes of Pointless being filmed and you’ll see why I’m really quite excited about this one and have been since it was announced back in May. It feels like it’s been a long wait already.

So there you have it, five books that I’m looking forward to this year.  The list could have been longer – there are new books coming that I’m looking foward to from Lucy Parker, Gail Carriger, Deanna Raybourn and more, but I thought I’d try not to be too predictable!

Happy Reading!

Book previews

Books I’m looking forward to in 2019

Happy New Year everyone.  I hope you had a good night last night and are able to relax and unwind today.  I’m working this New Years Day, so think of me if you’re cozy at home and if you’re also working, you have all my sympathy!  The final stats post of 2018 is coming tomorrow, but instead of a Book of the Week post today, I’ve got a look ahead at some of the upcoming books that I can’t wait to read in 2019.

I’m a sucker for a novel based on real events and real people when they’re done well (see my love of Gone with the Windsors) and I’ve heard a lot of good things about A Well-Behaved Woman by Theresa Anne Fowler.  It follows Alva Smith – better known as Alva Vanderbilt as she navigates her way through Gilded Age society.  The Kindle edition is out now in the UK with the paperback coming at the end of January and I have an advance copy sitting on my kindle waiting for a quiet afternoon in front of the fire…

Another one sitting on the Kindle waiting for me is the Sidney Chambers prequel The Road to Grantchester which comes out in March.  I was sad when the series proper ended (the books, not the TV series – I gave up on that during the 3rd season), so the idea of a look at how Sidney came to be in Grantchester really appeals to me.

Also in March is Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid.  About the events leading up to the unexplained break-up of a hugely successful band in 1979, it’s already been optioned by Reese Witherspoon’s production company.  I have a mixed record with stories about bands – but enough of them have ended up being Books of the Week that I’m optimistic about this one.

Even further into 2019 is The Doll Factory by Elizabeth MacNeal, which is being billed as being a historical novel about art, obsession and possession – when an aspiring artist become the model for a pre-Raphaelite artist.  It’s out at the start of May and is getting a lot of buzz – so I’m looking forward to reading it, but I’m a little worried it might be too dark and scary for me!

I loved Helen Hoang’s The Kiss Quotient in 2018, so I’m very excited for the follow-up The Bride Test which is also due in May and looks like a twist on the marriage of convenience/mail order bride trope with another neurodiverse leading player.  I can’t wait!

And halfway through the year, in June, is Montauk by Nicola Harrison, which tells the story of a summer by the Long Island seaside in 1938.  We all know that I love a rich people problems historical novel, and this looks like it could be spot on for me.  According to the blurb, Beatrice is hoping that the summer at the beach will help her revitalise her marriage.  But instead she’s stuck in a huge hotel with people she’s never fit in with while her husband is back in the city.  Instead she’s drawn to the year-round community and a man who is very unlike her husband.

And finally, this is not quite a next year book – as it cames out here on December 27th – and I don’t really do business improvement/self-help books but after hearing about it in an email Karen Wickre’s Taking the Work Out of Networking Connections: An Introvert’s Guide to Making Connections That Count sounds like something I could really use.  I am not a naturally outgoing person – I’m very bad at networking and making connections and use social media as a crutch to get over the fact that I just can’t bring myself to call people I haven’t spoken to in ages just for a chat and a catch up.  Perhaps 2019 is the year to change that?

Let me know what you’re looking forward to reading in 2019 in the comments!